How to tell to your Antivirus to allow FrostWire?

Have you tried to install FrosWire and your antivirus didn’t allow it? In this article we will explain you how to fix that! It’s important to know that FrostWire installer downloaded directly from our website (www.frostwire.com) or via automatic update doesn’t contain any trojans or viruses. 

When for some reason your antivirus flags FrostWire, here are the steps you can follow to allow your Antivirus let FrostWire run. We have done the step by step tutorials for AVG and Webroot, but the steps necessary should be similar for any antivirus on the market.


NORTON

  • Follow these steps to tell Norton you want to allow FrostWire installation if you are on a Mac PC:
    Allow FrostWire on Mac

If you have a Windows PC check the article below. Go to the section called ‘Exclude files or folders from scan’ under ‘What to do after you submit a false positive’. Make sure to apply the steps when installing FrostWire. You don’t have to report a ‘false positive’ since this will take more time to solve the issue, only in case the exception option doesn’t work:
Allow FrostWire on Windows

AVG

1. Download FrostWire installer from FrostWire.com and once the AVG launches an alert when trying to install FrostWire, select the option to “Allow” the app.

You then should see the following screen saying the file has been successfully added to the exception list:

 

 

2. If you get more than one alert when trying to install FrostWire then a list of files could be displayed as follow:

To add these files to the list of exceptions you must check the address where the file is saved by selecting the file with the red “x” symbol and clicking on “View details”

3. Adding more exceptions: Now that you have the route where the file is saved go to the right top Options menu on the main screen of AVG

Once there, go to Advanced settings… > Exceptions > Add exception and select the exception type Application or File so you will be able to browse your file and add the address where the file is located.

The files added to the AVG exceptions shouldn’t block the installation of your app again.

Webroot

1. Download FrostWire installer from FrostWire.com. Do not clean up the frostwire-setup.exe file when Webroot wants to Clean it, this is the FrostWire installer, not a virus or threat.
 
2. Your antivirus blocks FrostWire from installing, so you must add an exception, to do it select the PC Security icon on the Webroot screen and select the label to Block/Allow Files. Then tap on “Add File” to select the installer frostwire-6.0.x.windows.coc.premium.exe  and click “Allow.”
3. When you open the Installer yet again, Webroot will show you another alert saying the file is trying to connect to the Internet. In this case select the option “Allow Always” – that will allow FrostWire to install and run properly.
4. If Webroot launches more alerts about treats such as the file ocsetuphlp.dll, then you will have to add that file to the exceptions too. To do it, check the address Webroot is indicating where the folder is located. If this is a Windows “hide” folder then do this:
  • Click on Start > My Computer.
  • On that window click on Tools > Folder Options
  • Then, click on the View tab at the top of the window.
  • Under Advanced Settings, locate Hidden files and folders. Select Show hidden files and folders just below that.
  • Click on OK.
  • Hidden files will now be shown.

5. Now you can see where the file marked as a threat is located and do the same you did with the installer, select the PC Security icon on the Webroot screen and select the label to Block/Allow Files. Next tap on “Add File” to select the file C:\……\ocsetuphlp.dll and click the option “AllowAfter you have completed the steps, try to open the FrostWire installer again – it should install and run with no issues.

If your antivirus is marking FrostWire as Trojan, the steps to allow it are the same.

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Get FrostWire 1.9.9 build 471!

DOWNLOAD NOW!

We’re still working on FrostWire 2.0, but right now we invite you to download our latest build of FrostWire 1.9.9! This new release includes a lot of fixed bugs, and quality improvements!

Changelog

FrostWire 1.9.9 build 471 – NOV/29/2017
– App Startup is faster
– Multiple freezes fixed, memory leaks fixed, crashes fixed
– Android Jelly-Bean (<4.4) support dropped, minSdkVersion=19
– Library updates: jlibtorrent 1.2.0.15-RC3, gms 11.6.0, mopub 4.18.0, flexbox 0.3.1, applovin 7.5.0, presage 2.2.2
– Image viewer can now go to next and previous pictures with fling gesture
– Update system refactor, cleanup, updates shown on nav menu
– New Afrikaans translation
– Transfer screen on rotation would not keep last tab selected
– Java 8 usage, gradle 4.3.1
– compileSDKVersion 27, support libraries 27.0.1, kotlin plugin 1.1.51
– Material design dialog update
– TPB domain update

What is FrostWire?

FrostWire is a free, open source BitTorrent client first released in September 2004, as a fork of LimeWire. It was initially very similar to LimeWire in appearance and functionality, but over time developers added more features, including support for the BitTorrent protocol and a full blown media player.

FrostWire running on an #OLPC Tablet

FrostWire running on the OLPC tablet.

FrostWire is a very powerful research tool, its smart file meta search can find millions of files in the public domain and under Creative Commons licenses, among those, many unvaluable books, instructional videos and lectures in every academic discipline.

The One Laptop Per Child project is an amazing educational initiative that has put technology in the hands of over 2.5 million children worldwide, truly transformative stories have ocurred in the process, many will give you the goosebumps to hear.

More recently the project has recognized the evolution in personal computing technology and the advent of tablet devices, and their new iteration is a tablet, an Android tablet.

FrostWire runs on Android, now OLPC users will be able to use the powerful FrostWire smart file meta search technology and Wi-Fi sharing capabilities to discover, learn and share.

About One Laptop Per Child
One Laptop per Child (OLPC) is a project supported by the Miami-based One Laptop per Child Association (OLPCA) and the Cambridge-based OLPC Foundation (OLPCF), two U.S. non-profit organizations set up to oversee the creation of affordable educational devices for use in the developing world. The project was originally funded by member organizations such as AMD, Chi Mei, eBay, Google, Marvell Technology Group, News Corporation, Nortel, Red Hat, and Quanta.